Component

MA Public Opinion and Political Behaviour
BA Drama and Literature options

Year 2, Component 02

2nd year Theatre Studies option(s) from list
LT226-5-SP
Fiction Filmmaking
(15 CREDITS)

Building on the knowledge and skills gained in the prerequisite Introduction to Film Production, you gain a variety of production techniques, from research, script writing, adaptation, location shooting and editing. You also address key management skills, from learning how to properly plan a project, to collaborating with actors. Working as part of a small group, you conclude the module by producing an imaginative and creative short film.

LT227-5-AU
Directing Actors for Film
(15 CREDITS)

Focusing on a number of different approaches to directing, in this module you learn how to work creatively and collaboratively with actors for film. You take inspiration from famous film directors and critically analyse their directing style. You cover the process of directing from start to finish, from script analysis for casting, rehearsals and film production. It involves both theoretical and practice-based sessions, allowing you to study directing in a realistic environment.

LT229-5-FY
On-screen Anti-heroes
(30 CREDITS)

Why are we drawn to the onscreen antihero? Does a film like Joker represent something profound about class status or mental health, or is there something alluring about the character's explicit non-conformity to everyday behaviour? Similarly, why do we play computer games or watch television programmes that challenge societal norms through violence and criminal activity? Does new media technology contribute to the ubiquity of morally questionable characters into new everyday spaces? This module focuses upon the idea of the antihero across screen media, predominantly within film, television and computer gaming. It considers why audiences have and continue to be enticed by the darker side of entertainment and what these figures offer towards wider debates of morality and the representation of mental health onscreen.

TH205-5-SU
Performing Shakespeare
(15 CREDITS)

This hugely popular module is a chance to study four key Shakespeare texts in depth. This option will allow you to master some of Shakespeare’s most rich and complex plays through practical work and seminars. Understand these seminal works and build your confidence by coming to grips with the language, dramatic conventions and characteristics of plays which are at the heart of our theatre culture. By the end of the course you will feel at home with texts which beforehand may have seemed forbidding or difficult.

TH207-5-SP
Technical Theatre Arts
(15 CREDITS)
TH211-5-PS
Global Encounters in Theatre and Film
(15 CREDITS)
TH241-5-FY
Theatre and Performance Makers
(30 CREDITS)

What are the links and connections between texts? Do these exist even if the plays seem diverse? Explore a range of texts from the medieval period to the 1980s, analysing genre, dramatic form, language, narrative and dramatic debate. Through practical sessions, consider approaches like staging, verse-speaking, montage and character development.

TH243-5-FY
Tragedy and Theatre Writing
(30 CREDITS)

How are Aristotle’s theories about tragedy still useful? How have they been modified or rejected by playwrights since? And can you write a short tragedy? Examine tragedy in theatre, from classic Greek tragedy to now. Understand how playwrights adapt tragic forms and structures to speak more powerfully to their audience.

TH245-5-FY
Gender in Performance: Sexual Politics and the Stage
(30 CREDITS)

One of our highest rated modules examines how the theatre explores and exploits gender in performance. Can theatre make a significant contribution to our understanding of the shifting picture of sexual identity and ideology? This module takes a dynamic historical sweep to examine how the theatre has debated sexual politics. Here we apply gender theory and feminist criticism to examine a range of plays, theatre practitioners and performance artists. This is a module for anyone curious to understand the many ways perceptions of gender influence identity, image, expression and power.

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